Study Tips for Finals Week

As it gets closer to the holidays, you will be anticipating finals. Do not wait until the last minute to start your review and study sessions. Start reviewing at least three weeks ahead of time to make sure that you are well prepared. If you wait until the last few days before the exam and cram, you will more than likely not be able to remember the information because it will not be stored in your long term memory. Instead, during the first week of review begin by reviewing over your notes. It is best that you review your notes throughout the semester. As you start reviewing your notes, highlight the important ideas and add in more information that you have learned from your reading. In other words, fill in any missing information from your notes as you probably were in a hurry writing everything down. Make sure to take thorough notes so that you are able to remember the main ideas the teacher has discussed because more than likely they are going to use mostly information from what they have talked about in class, along with adding details regarding this information from the book on the exam. They expect you to have done all the reading so that you know the details in correspondence with the main ideas and concepts they have focused on in class. Once you have added in any missing information from your notes and added details from the text based on the main ideas written in your notes, type out the new notes on your computer. Use bullet points to emphasize the main ideas and make sure to add plenty of details combining your notes with the text. You can color code your notes to organize the main ideas. You can also make flash cards with the information you have gathered from your notes and the book to review for exams, and this way you will be able to make sure you have mastered the materials. Read and re-read your notes.

 

 

During the last week or two before your finals re-read the chapters focusing on the main ideas the teacher has discussed in class. Annotate your text with notes from class and review your text. Make sure to focus on the dark print terms in the text and the information under the pictures in your text book. Anything is fair game on the final. Do not just focus on the main terms, but all of the main ideas as a whole in the chapter. Read the notes at the end of the chapter if there are any and review your homework questions. The homework questions could reappear in the exam because the teacher has let you know that they are significant. Also, if you have your tests from the semester, make sure to review them because the teacher may use material from old test questions in a different context or the exact ones. Once you have studied your revised notes and the book, write down everything you can remember and check what you know about the terms and the ideas with your notes and the book. Fill in any missing information or change information that you missed. Re-read over the revisions and repeat this pattern until you can remember most everything. This will prove that the information you have studied is in your long term memory. You should not get test anxiety or go blank because you know the material and you can recall the information. You can also use creative techniques to recall information and terms using rhymes or connecting one term to the next in a way that you can remember. You can use diagrams, charts, webs, or graphs to help you connect information and remember it for recall purposes. Teach the material to someone else to make sure you have the information down. Hold a study group and write down any questions you have and compare and contrast answers with your friends. Write down questions based on the terms that you think might be on the test and cover over the answer when you are reviewing. These are all great studying techniques to make sure you have mastered the materials. Once you get to the exam, you will be confident that you know the information by following these strategies.

 

Julie

About Julie

Julie is a tutor and featured blogger with Academic Advantage Online Tutoring who enjoys Reading, Writing, Studying the arts, humanities, and sciences.

 

Steps to Finding the Right College Major

Choosing electives in high school that more accurately align with your subject interests will help you find the right college major. If possible, it is best to choose a high school that offers the most electives in the subject areas that interest you. These electives will help you prepare for college by extending your critical thinking skills outside of your main academic courses and you may be able to take the electives at the college level for the major or minor that you choose. Some schools only offer a few electives such as band, art, study hall, teacher’s aid, or a foreign language while others offer electives in most subjects. By choosing electives such as communication skills, journalism, accounting, business law, creative writing, computer applications, graphic design, painting, drama/theatre, CPR training, first aid, nutrition, rhetoric, science courses, religion, social science, among others you will learn to apply what you have learned in related topics in your main courses to these practical subject areas.

Choosing an elective that is based on one of your strongest academic subjects is the best way to find out if choosing a college major in the subject is right for you. You will have to make the transition from mainly using rote- memorization in high school to application based learning on tests, papers, and other assignments. Finding an elective that helps you learn these critical thinking skills in high school will greatly help you in college. One way to choose an elective that best corresponds to your subject interests is to take the Myers-Briggs personality test and use it to find what subject matter connects to your personality type. Most students change their majors numerous times once they start college because they either did not spend enough time thinking about how to approach finding the right major before they started school. To avoid this, take time out of your schedule to talk to a guidance counselor, find electives that meet your subject interests and personality type, and do outside reading on your favorite subjects before starting college. Though most students do not take electives as seriously as their main courses, focusing on an elective that interests you may help you find a college major that you will finish school with a degree in.

Take a look at the link below:

Julie

About Julie

Julie is a tutor and featured blogger with Academic Advantage Online Tutoring who enjoys Reading, Writing, Studying the arts, humanities, and sciences.

 

High School Students and Summer Plans

High school students, what are your summer plans? By the time the school year is close to its end, all of my students can’t wait for the summer break to arrive. Students anticipate spending their time with friends and family, focusing on enjoying their carefree summer. Although I think it is essential that students have fun over the summer, it is also important to make sure that a student’s summer is a productive time of preparation for the year ahead. Summers should certainly be filled with fun activities with friends and family, but students should also not lose sight of their educational dreams goals.

I spoke with some of my SAT Prep students who were telling me about summer travel plans, summer camp plans, and other fun-sounding activities. One of my students is taking a cruise to Alaska with her grandparents, while another is going to camp for the last time as a camper. I am happy to hear their excitement as they describe their plans to me. In the back of my mind, however, I think about their dream schools, and the test scores they would need to achieve to get into these schools. I remind these two students that they need to stay committed to continuing to prepare for the SAT, ACT, and Advanced Placement tests.[1]

The students both respond that they know they cannot just have fun all summer. The students know that they have to continue to study so that they can have a less stressful school year. “But how,” they ask me, “can I study for these exams and stay focused during all of these fun activities?”

I tell my students that planning ahead of time is the best way to achieve success. Together, we form an individualized plan for each student and their particular summer plans. The student who is going on a cruise to Alaska with her grandparents will take her SAT Prep book with her, as well as her AP English Language Summer work. We plan that she will spend one hour every other day working on SAT Prep and read a chapter of her AP English Language Summer Work on the days that she does not do SAT Prep. The other student who is going to camp for the last time will utilize the camp’s SAT Prep sessions. The class meets once per week as an extra enrichment activity at the camp. She will also try to complete her Summer AP Biology work, spending at least one hour every week on reading her AP Biology textbook.

With these plans in place, both girls will definitely be prepared for the next school year. Take the advice in this article, and your child can be prepared too.

[1] I encourage my students to get ahead over the summer for the coming year’s AP Classes. This way, they can make sure they achieve good grades but also not feel too stressed about preparing just a few months before the exam.

Blog Post by Rachel S. Stuart a Tutor and Featured Blogger for Academic Advantage Tutoring

rachel-close-up-good-pic (183x200)

About Rachel

I have always been a proud “nerd.” When I could, I always helped my friends with their homework because I just loved to teach them how to think about the world differently. In particular, history and writing have always been my specialties. When I was a little girl, my aspiration was to one day be a history professor! I hope to begin Master’s classes in the field of education and continue to be fascinated by changing technology in the classroom and different ways of engaging my students’ creativity!
Honors and awards: Phi Beta Kappa, Highest Honors in History Honors Program at Emory, Recipient of the Theodore H. Jack Award, Phi Alpha Theta, Pi Sigma Alpha, Dean’s List at Emory.

Diagnostic Testing before Tutoring

Diagnostic testing before tutoring students is important. Testing allows the tutor to view the test results and tutor the student in the shortest amount of time possible. The tutor knows first-hand any weak or strong areas of the student and does not have to waste time trying to determine what a student knows and does not know.  Initial diagnostic testing saves the student both time and money and gets the best results possible for the student.

It is difficult to help a student achieve positive results in one or two tutoring sessions. When students start tutoring and notice improvement and then stops attending the tutoring the sessions, it results in the students not completing the sessions to fill the academic gap.  The academic gap, although shortened within  the short tutoring time, still exists and grows larger again during the school year. In addition, last minute tutoring cram sessions for final exams and test prep do not work.  Last minute tutoring puts stress on both the student and the tutor.  When students come the night before a test, or just weeks before SAT or ACT, there is usually not enough time to cover the material and practice to make sure that the student has mastered the material and is comfortable with the curriculum.  Waiting until the last minute leads students to procrastination.  Research shows that students who procrastinate do not do well in college.  See article.

Tutoring works best when students and parents are committed to improving academic levels and agree to a planned scheduled of academic lessons at the beginning of the school year, preferably, starting during the summer before the upcoming school year. Improving gaps in learning and working ahead of the class curriculum reduces stress and anxiety for the student and gives the student confidence in his or her academic abilities.  When students are on a consistent tutor/study schedule, they learn how to plan, practice and study ahead.  This breaks the cycle of procrastination.  In addition, the student gains an academic foundation for success on college admissions exams and will do well in college.   A current research study states that only a third of high school seniors are equipped for college-level math and reading.  See article. When students do not have a proper academic foundation, they will struggle in future courses and on tests.

SAT/ACT/PSAT test prep also works best when students begin as early the 9th grade year to prepare for these exams.  Students are competing on a national playing field and must begin preparing as soon as possible.  Although a student is making A’s and B’s in his or her school, this is no guarantee that the student will do well on the SAT or ACT without test prep.  School work is simply not enough for a student to do well on the test.  Many students have not had English Grammar since elementary school and lack the knowledge of the grammar rules needed for the English/Writing and Reading portions of the SAT/ACT and PSAT.  Many students are also weak in math.  A consistent math review helps students to learn the math needed to do well on the exams.  Test prep also helps students to know the format of the test first-hand and know what to expect when they take the test.  It is never a good idea to allow a student to take the SAT or ACT to merely see how he or she will do.  Students should know what is on the test and know what to expect on test day to significantly increase their chances of obtaining a high score.

Study and preparation along with time and effort is the key to academic success!

Multiple Choice Portion of AP Exams

So many of my students detest the Multiple Choice Questions portion of AP exams. However, with some guidance, a student can easily conquer this portion of the exam. Here is the caveat:  this portion of the exam requires practicing the right skills. However, to the inexperienced student, knowing what the right skills are remains a major challenge. This is why most students need a teacher or a tutor to help them ace the AP Exam.

After going over their multiple choice questions, I had  a conversation with two of my AP Human Geography students. Their problem with certain questions of the AP Multiple Choice Question portion of the exam were due to their lack of strategic thinking when answering the question. We had come up against a problem that was a definition-identification question, and I asked them to go through each of the options strategically together. I told them to go as slowly as possible, and to think through why each option was correct or incorrect. While talking of each option together, they both reached the right conclusion, after careful examination.

During multiple choice exams students sometimes lack the care to pay attention to details. They want to get through the exam quickly–which is definitely important–but their choice to prioritize speed over scrutinizing the question got them into trouble.

That’s why I advise my students to first take exams without paying attention to speed. During practice exams, students should focus on developing the critical thinking skills to answer high-level multiple choice questions for any kind of AP Exam–from science, to the humanities. After achieving high numbers of correct questions, the student should then move on to practicing during a timed test.

Tutors or teachers are best suited to help students simulate a timed exam. Tutors also know how to gradually introduce the timed test to a student. They know the point at which a student is ready for a timed exam, and they know how to help students become accustomed to timed exams so that students don’t feel overly anxious. Moreover, tutors know how to proctor exams properly, and they know how to score exams in the same manner as an AP Scorer.

With a tutor’s help, any student can become thoroughly prepared for test day!

Blog Post by Rachel S. Stuart a Tutor and Featured Blogger for Academic Advantage Tutoring

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About Rachel

I have always been a proud “nerd.” When I could, I always helped my friends with their homework because I just loved to teach them how to think about the world differently. In particular, history and writing have always been my specialties. When I was a little girl, my aspiration was to one day be a history professor! I hope to begin Master’s classes in the field of education and continue to be fascinated by changing technology in the classroom and different ways of engaging my students’ creativity!
Honors and awards: Phi Beta Kappa, Highest Honors in History Honors Program at Emory, Recipient of the Theodore H. Jack Award, Phi Alpha Theta, Pi Sigma Alpha, Dean’s List at Emory.

 

AP Exam-Steps to Write a DBQ or Synthesis Paper

DBQs and Synthesis papers continue to be very challenging to AP students. As I mentioned in my previous post about what a DBQ or Synthesis paper is [which you can find here] I will explain the method to write a successful DBQ or Synthesis paper on your AP Exam.  (For clarification, a the DBQ is a Document-Based Question for social science exams, while the Synthesis paper is a similar for the English Language and Literature Exams.)

First, you should read the prompt carefully and bullet point what the directions are asking you to do! Generally, for the these types of essays, the directions ask you to use prior knowledge of the subject area as well as the given sources to create an argument or answer the question. First, note what your prior knowledge is on your scratch paper. Write how you would answer the question or the prompt based on only prior knowledge. You should try to formulate an answer before looking at the sources because this will guide your interpretation when surveying the sources.

The next step is to actually look through the sources. Note each author’s argument in the sources and the way that they made their argument, also known as the author’s rhetoric.The student must identify rhetorical devices on the AP English Language and Literature Exams, while on the AP World and US History Exams, the student must look for historical data and author biases. Understanding an author’s bias on a history exam is one of the requirements of the DBQ for these exams. Biases affect the way that historical actors record history, so as historians, we have to make sure to account for certain biases when analyzing the historical actor’s written work. We cannot always take their writings at face value, for historical actors may have had a certain agenda when writing the document.

Mark up each document and leave yourself a note in summary of the document so that you can go back to the document later and remember in detail what the document argued or meant. For the AP English Language and Literature Exam, many teachers advise their students to mark the document’s tone through a visual aid: a “+” represents a positive tone, while a “-” represents a negative tone. This quick representation of tone helps when the student begins writing the response.

The next step is to outline your argument, starting with your thesis. In general, an English Language thesis requires the student to analyze an argument, either historical or contemporary. An English Literature thesis compels the student to analyze the author’s use of rhetorical devices to create a successful piece of literature. On social science exams, the student must create a thesis that his historically-sound and also uses the given sources as evidence for their argument.

Once you have created a thesis, and an outline, you are ready to begin writing your paper. Good luck!

Blog Post by Rachel S. Stuart a Tutor and Featured Blogger for Academic Advantage Tutoring

rachel-close-up-good-pic (183x200)

About Rachel

I have always been a proud “nerd.” When I could, I always helped my friends with their homework because I just loved to teach them how to think about the world differently. In particular, history and writing have always been my specialties. When I was a little girl, my aspiration was to one day be a history professor! I hope to begin Master’s classes in the field of education and continue to be fascinated by changing technology in the classroom and different ways of engaging my students’ creativity!
Honors and awards: Phi Beta Kappa, Highest Honors in History Honors Program at Emory, Recipient of the Theodore H. Jack Award, Phi Alpha Theta, Pi Sigma Alpha, Dean’s List at Emory.

AP Exams-What is a DBQ?

When you first begin writing, it is hard enough to formulate an argument and back it up with evidence. Synthesizing information is not something that comes very easily to high school writers. I remember when I was assigned my first Document Based Question (DBQ), and I was anxious about where to begin. Luckily, my teachers had effective lesson plans, and I understood how to write a DBQ after some time and practice. In this blog post, I will explain what a DBQ is and why it is on several AP Exams, in order to show parents and students that this exam question is actually easier than the others!

Document Based Question may seem like a vague term. You may be wondering: what kind of documents is this title referring to? What kind of prompt will I have to answer? How can I get the most points on this part of the exam? I will try to answer these questions for you in this blog post!

The title of the essay question format, Document Based Question, actually refers to documents. These documents are pieces of historical or contemporary news articles, historical sources like diaries, letters or legal documents, pictures, maps, political cartoons, and many other types of documents. Instead of having to come up with your own reasons why your argument is correct, you are given evidence by the College Board on this part of the exam. This evidence should guide your thesis and the rest of your essay. You should always go through the documents thoroughly, in order to see how you should compose your thesis.

Usually, prompts on AP English Language and Composition Exams ask questions about contemporary issues and ask students to formulate arguments about these issues. For example, a popular AP English Language exam question focuses on the ramifications of social media on society. This is different from the prompts a student will be assigned on Social Science Exams, which pose questions that pertain to the subject matter of the course.

On AP US History exams, you are required to use at least six documents in your analysis, while on AP English Language and Composition exams, you are required to use just three. Depending on the exam, the number of documents needed in the analysis changes, so be sure to ask your teacher or tutor about the specifics of your exam. By correctly analyzing the documents and using more than the specified number of documents on your exam, you will gain extra points on that portion of the essay.

You may still have questions about why this type of essay exam is important to assess your knowledge of the course, especially after completing an entire multiple choice portion of the exam prior to this. DBQs are important because they require the high-level analysis that the College Board cannot judge just from the multiple choice portion of the exam. In addition, DBQs are important because these questions are the most like those you will find in a real college end-of-term exam. In fact, in humanities courses in many colleges, multiple choice exams are rarely used. Professors more than likely will require students to write essays in class in order to pass their class’s final!

My next blog post will focus on how to write a DBQ. Stay tuned for more info!

Blog Post by Rachel S. Stuart a Tutor and Featured Blogger for Academic Advantage Tutoring

rachel-close-up-good-pic (183x200)

About Rachel

I have always been a proud “nerd.” When I could, I always helped my friends with their homework because I just loved to teach them how to think about the world differently. In particular, history and writing have always been my specialties. When I was a little girl, my aspiration was to one day be a history professor! I hope to begin Master’s classes in the field of education and continue to be fascinated by changing technology in the classroom and different ways of engaging my students’ creativity!
Honors and awards: Phi Beta Kappa, Highest Honors in History Honors Program at Emory, Recipient of the Theodore H. Jack Award, Phi Alpha Theta, Pi Sigma Alpha, Dean’s List at Emory.

Ace Your AP United States History Test

The second-most popular Advanced Placement Exam in 2013 was Advanced Placement United States History, which was just slightly less popular than the Advanced Placement English Language Test.[1] The course’s curriculum introduces the student to the US’s major historical themes and events. Because this class is widely taken among AP students, this post will focus on some advice that I normally give my students to prepare for the exam.

A good AP United States History test student should be attentive in class and write detailed notes during their teacher’s lecture. The teacher is an expert on American history and can provide many major insights and analyses that you will not necessarily get when reading the textbook that accompanies the class. United States History is a discipline with varying opinions and emphases on differing events.

A teacher may have done in-depth research into the Proclamation of 1763 and its ramifications for the United States, and therefore can provide the student with insights that may not be found in a typical textbook. Their research will enrich a student’s understanding of the event that can be later written on the AP US History Essay portion of the exam. Moreover, tutors like me who were United States History majors may also have done intense research into American History topics, and can add analytical perspectives to a student’s understandings of US History that could not necessarily be found in any textbook or Prep-book.

That is not to say that the student should not read the textbook, they certainly should. Reading the textbook will help the student to understand the narrative arc of United States History. In fact, I often advise students to read their chapters more than once before the AP Exam, because it will help them remember the sequence of major events. While reading their textbook, they should take special note of any pictures or documents in the textbook, because these primary sources will likely be referenced in either the Multiple Choice or the Essay Portion of the exam. It may be helpful for the one to write an analysis of several of these primary sources as practice for the AP Exam’s questions of interpretation.

Students should also try to immerse themselves into US history. They should read classic American history novels, like The Scarlet Letter, Huckleberry Finn, Moby Dick, The Grapes of Wrath, and The Great Gatsby. By understanding the characters found in these books, students will have a greater personal grasp of history.

If you take these steps, you too will be prepared to ace your AP US History Test!

[1] “10 Most (and Least) Popular Advanced Placement (AP) Subjects.” Education by the Numbers.org. 2014. Web. 15 Apr. 2016. <http://educationbythenumbers.org/content/10-least-popular-advanced-placement-ap-subjects_930/>.

Blog Post by Rachel S. Stuart a Tutor and Featured Blogger for Academic Advantage Tutoring

rachel-close-up-good-pic (183x200)

About Rachel

I have always been a proud “nerd.” When I could, I always helped my friends with their homework because I just loved to teach them how to think about the world differently. In particular, history and writing have always been my specialties. When I was a little girl, my aspiration was to one day be a history professor! I hope to begin Master’s classes in the field of education and continue to be fascinated by changing technology in the classroom and different ways of engaging my students’ creativity!
Honors and awards: Phi Beta Kappa, Highest Honors in History Honors Program at Emory, Recipient of the Theodore H. Jack Award, Phi Alpha Theta, Pi Sigma Alpha, Dean’s List at Emory.

 

Preparation for AP Exam Essays

Six years ago, when I was in an AP English Language and Composition class in high school, in-class essays were the bane of my existence. The difficulty stemmed from the intense and frequent AP English Language and Composition practice test essays that we completed in class. There were so many, and we had to complete these practice essays at least once a week! However, as much as I despised doing these weekly practice essays, I completely understood why my teacher imposed these assignments on our class. The assignments were necessary to us to become fluent writers.

Six years later, I recommend to my students that they write as much as possible. I tell my students that it doesn’t matter what he or she is writing about at first. My goal is to have my students become comfortable processing their thoughts through the written word. The practice of writing habitually—in a journal, blog, or a letter to a friend—will furnish the student with the ability to apply thought to the page. When the student becomes   used to string-of-consciousness essay writing, the essay portion of the exam would not seem as frightening or insurmountable.

I also advise students to regularly write about the subjects they are studying in school, as writing out the ideas on paper will help them to remember information that could appear on tests. Keeping a journal or detailed notes about what is going on in class will definitely help the student to be able to work out intricate ideas and analysis through writing. Later on, this experience with analysis will also help students to ace their exams.

When a student takes an  AP exam with a writing component, they should prepare before writing. Some teachers and tutors suggest that students follow formulaic pre-planning steps, such as creating bullet points or clustering ideas. Both of these methods involve brainstorming. In the bullet points method, the student can jot down ideas and  keep these ideas in order by putting a bullet point in front of each separate idea. In a similar exercise, a student can create a cluster of related ideas separated by circles. After this brainstorming exercise, the student can then begin the outline for the paper with a thesis and a topic sentence for each paragraph.

Despite the importance of pre-planning, the ability to process thought into words is arguably the most important step to achieve high marks on the AP Exam Essays. Pre-planning can only take the student so far; if a student knows how to turn thought into prose, he or she will most definitely succeed. Writing practice will prepare the student to answer all necessary components of the essay prompt with style and efficiency to well in their preparation for AP Exam Essays.

Blog Post by Rachel S. Stuart a Tutor and Featured Blogger for Academic Advantage Tutoring

rachel-close-up-good-pic (183x200)

About Rachel

I have always been a proud “nerd.” When I could, I always helped my friends with their homework because I just loved to teach them how to think about the world differently. In particular, history and writing have always been my specialties. When I was a little girl, my aspiration was to one day be a history professor! I hope to begin Master’s classes in the field of education and continue to be fascinated by changing technology in the classroom and different ways of engaging my students’ creativity!
Honors and awards: Phi Beta Kappa, Highest Honors in History Honors Program at Emory, Recipient of the Theodore H. Jack Award, Phi Alpha Theta, Pi Sigma Alpha, Dean’s List at Emory.

When a Student Needs Academic Support

There’s one easy pin-point moment when a parent knows without hesitation that a child needs help with their school work. That’s when the parent receives a phone call from the student’s teacher explaining that the student is struggling with the topic, is falling behind with school work, and may be making grades below a “C.” As a parent, you may feel relieved to hear that the teacher is in touch with your child’s progress and that you were promptly alerted to the difficulties as they appeared. Some parents even feel a little guilty for not realizing the problem themselves. Parents may even wonder to themselves, “What are the warning signs that my child is falling behind in school? How can I better prepare my child for success?”

Parents can identify when a child is struggling in school when that child comes home and has a strong aversion to completing homework. When a parent has to play “homework police” that may be the first warning sign that the child is struggling with a concept. Students may try to avoid a specific type of school work because they feel bad that it is a subject that they struggle with. Essentially, a student’s self-esteem drops when they come across a topic that they cannot master without the help of an adult. Students can become vehemently against completing assignments that make them feel inferior. They may disobey parents in order to avoid doing homework that they need extra help with.

These anxieties should be eased by reinforcing the concepts that the student needs help with. Parents could do this by asking for some direction from the student’s teachers and then helping the student with the concepts. Parents should try to become familiar with his or the child’s personal areas of strength or weakness. Reviewing the child’s test scores and seeing how they are doing with their work firsthand is the best first step to help a student to succeed in school. Every child’s learning style is different, and a parent could spend some time getting to know how their child learns in order to evaluate his or her needs.

Asking a tutor for additional help is also a great way to bolster a student’s skills in their most needed area of learning. Tutors have experience with evaluating where the student’s learning level is and how to best support continual growth in a student’s skills.

Thanks for reading! Please do not hesitate to reach out to me with questions. Email me at rachelsstuart@gmail.com.

Blog Post by Rachel S. Stuart a Tutor and Featured Blogger for Academic Advantage Tutoring

rachel-close-up-good-pic (183x200)

About Rachel

I have always been a proud “nerd.” When I could, I always helped my friends with their homework because I just loved to teach them how to think about the world differently. In particular, history and writing have always been my specialties. When I was a little girl, my aspiration was to one day be a history professor! I hope to begin Master’s classes in the field of education and continue to be fascinated by changing technology in the classroom and different ways of engaging my students’ creativity!
Honors and awards: Phi Beta Kappa, Highest Honors in History Honors Program at Emory, Recipient of the Theodore H. Jack Award, Phi Alpha Theta, Pi Sigma Alpha, Dean’s List at Emory.
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