Improving Your Scholarship in High School

In high school, you typically are very busy with after school activities and may not have enough time to put into your studies.  Nonetheless, you can still find time to set aside for your studies and work on improving your overall GPA by using your time wisely. Do not quit one of your activities if you can. Instead work to plan strategies that will provide you with more time to study by changing with your schedule. Add a study hall to your schedule to give yourself more time to study during the day, or make sure to use the time you have before your extracurricular activities begin to study. During your lunch break, use the time to study if you have an upcoming test or quiz.  It is better to get your work done earlier than later because you will be less likely to focus at night and you won’t do your best. Do not wait until late at night to study because you will not retain the information you need to succeed and do not cram the night before.  Make sure when you study on the weekends to take a short break every hour, because you can only focus for a certain amount of time. Your short term memory cannot remember what it needs to and process loads of new information if you wait until the night before an examination to study. You should make sure to study for a test at least two to three weeks in advance to remember the information.

You should go through your notes from class and power points. Use these notes as a guide when you go through your book. Re-write or type your notes by combining the notes from class and adding the corresponding information from the text to study. You can write questions for yourself on flash cards or make a chart out of the information with the answer on the other side to review. If you make a chart, you can fold the paper or cover the answer over so that you can look at the question and write it out and then check your answer on the other side of the page afterward. Make sure to re-read the chapters at least two to three times. When you read the chapters, make sure to annotate your text with notes and highlight important definitions, words, or phrases that you think are important and that were discussed in class. You can also create a mnemonic device as code to remember information.  If you don’t re-read the chapters and write a set of review notes or highlight important information, you will not retain the material as well. You must learn to take good notes in high school if you want to succeed in college. Do not sit in the class and not take down as many notes as you can. You will not get the information you need out of the course and at the end of the semester; you won’t remember everything the teacher said in class. Organize your notes and save all of your papers to study for an exam study guide.

Try these strategies, and find a study plan that works best for you. You can also create a study group and compare notes to make sure that you wrote down all of the most pertinent information from the lecture. You do need to focus on more than just your grades if you want to get into college as they look for the best leaders. Whether  you sign up for the debate team, dance team, mathletes, cheerleading, band, foreign language club, forensics, social studies club, joining the band, doing ballet, gymnastics, playing a sport, or playing other musical instruments you must show that you are dedicated to becoming a well-rounded scholar that will contribute to their campus. These activities improve your ability to think and reason critically on a much higher level, which will help you succeed in your studies. You can also use these activities as a guide to choose a major. If you succeed at activities that use the right side of your brain you should choose a major that is artistic, while if you excel at activities that use the left side of your brain you should choose a major that is scientific. Thus, to do your best make sure to manage your time wisely, continue to do extracurricular activities, and you will begin improving your scholarship in high school.

Julie

 

About Julie

Julie is a tutor and featured blogger with Academic Advantage Online Tutoring who enjoys Reading, Writing, Studying the arts, humanities, and sciences.
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Do AP Exam Scores Really Matter?

When I was in high school–the nerd that I am–I thought that AP Classes were adequately challenging. The endless essays and readings didn’t faze me! But, I know that was far from the truth for many of my peers. They struggled with the course load. They’d taken the AP courses in pursuit of getting into their dream schools, whichever school that may be, but my peers never believed that the AP scores would actually help them when they got to College. They just thought the scores were a ticket into their college of choice, not an integral part of helping them to achieve the most they could in their undergraduate career. To be honest, I didn’t really see it that way either. I had found classes that showed me a different side of learning, but I also did not see how AP scores would really matter once I got to college. I was just looking to get my foot in the (best) door.

In all things, experience brings wisdom. I remember receiving my assigned time to enroll in my first semester of classes late in the summer. The email from the university had come unexpectedly, and I was excited that my enrollment time was so soon. In fact, I felt quite puzzled because I knew other freshman whose enrollment times were way later than mine. I thought, what makes me so special?

Little did I know that the AP Scores I had sent to my college played an essential role in this process. Later, when I had access to the transcripts section of the “Student Portal” (the online website through which a student enrolls in classes, checks grades, financial aid awards, among other things), I had achieved Sophomore-status as a Freshman. But, I had never attended college before! It was really encouraging to feel that I had a head start.

When I finally declared my major, I had another surprise. The introductory AP History courses that I took (AP World and AP US History) helped me to place out of the 100-level classes necessary to the requirements of my major. Instead of taking the boring 100-level classes, I could take Special Topics courses, take an extra elective for fun, or simply take a lighter course-load that semester and pursue an internship instead. The flexibility that the AP credit had given me allowed me to develop new interests and skills outside of my major.

Bottom line–if you are thinking that AP scores won’t help you in the long run, you’re wrong. They totally can and will help you to get the most out of your college experience! More information on the AP Exam here https://apstudent.collegeboard.org/takingtheexam/about-exams

Any questions? Contact me at rachelsstuart@gmail.com

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Blog Post by Rachel S. Stuart a Tutor and Featured Blogger for Academic Advantage Tutoring

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About Rachel

I have always been a proud “nerd.” When I could, I always helped my friends with their homework because I just loved to teach them how to think about the world differently. In particular, history and writing have always been my specialties. When I was a little girl, my aspiration was to one day be a history professor! I hope to begin Master’s classes in the field of education and continue to be fascinated by changing technology in the classroom and different ways of engaging my students’ creativity!
Honors and awards: Phi Beta Kappa, Highest Honors in History Honors Program at Emory, Recipient of the Theodore H. Jack Award, Phi Alpha Theta, Pi Sigma Alpha, Dean’s List at Emory.

 

 

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Get a Head Start with the CLEP Exam

Students and their parents are usually aware of the Advanced Placement Program. The Advanced Placement Program is taken as a high school class, either in school or online. Through this class, the student learns a subject at the introductory College level. Students can take as many Advanced Placement or “AP” classes as their schools allow. Some schools offer AP classes to only Juniors and Seniors, while other schools offer these classes to students as freshman. The allure of the AP class is that the student–if they do well enough–can earn credit toward their college degree. This can come in handy when you’re trying to get ahead in college, especially if the student wants to graduate early. Sometimes AP credit comes in handy when a student has a heavy course-load and would rather take only three advanced-level classes in a semester, instead of four. There are all kinds of reasons why AP Scores can make your life easier as a college student. Two advantages of AP Credit are earlier enrollment times and placing out of General Education Requirements.

While the AP Exam is an excellent program to introduce you or your student to college-level work, there are other ways to earn college credit while still in high school! One of these methods is through taking the CLEP Exam (College Level Examination Program). The CLEP Exam offers 33 Exams in many of the same areas that the AP Exam covers, but the student is not required to take the class for the exam. The student can independently study for the exam, take the exam, and then use the exam toward gaining college credit!

So what does this mean for the student? Oftentimes, students struggle in the AP classes that their schools offer, and this may be a good alternative to gaining college credit while still in high school. Because the student does not have to take the AP Class, they could take an Honors-level class or a regular class and maintain their GPA. That way, the student wouldn’t have unnecessary stress levels trying to complete the rigor of work in the AP Class. On the other hand, many students take the CLEP Exam if their school does not offer the AP class on-site. For example, some schools may not offer AP German, but there is a CLEP Exam in that area, so the student can still take that exam for College credit if it is an exam that interests them!

As for non-traditional degree seekers, CLEP exams remain the best source to finally get your degree! The CLEP Exams can cover almost all introdu

ctory-level classes in college. By taking these exams, you can really get a foothold in finally graduating and moving forward in your career. More Information here on the exam  https://clep.collegeboard.org/overview/collegecredit

Thanks for reading! If you have any questions about the CLEP Exam, feel free to email me at rachelsstuart@gmail.com.

Like what you read? Follow Us!

Blog Post by Rachel S. Stuart a Tutor and Featured Blogger for Academic Advantage Tutoring
rachel-close-up-good-pic (183x200)About Rachel

I have always been a proud “nerd.” When I could, I always helped my friends with their homework because I just loved to teach them how to think about the world differently. In particular, history and writing have always been my specialties. When I was a little girl, my aspiration was to one day be a history professor! I hope to begin Master’s classes in the field of education and continue to be fascinated by changing technology in the classroom and different ways of engaging my students’ creativity!
Honors and awards: Phi Beta Kappa, Highest Honors in History Honors Program at Emory, Recipient of the Theodore H. Jack Award, Phi Alpha Theta, Pi Sigma Alpha, Dean’s List at Emory.
Please follow and like us: